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Novels Lucia St. Clair Robson by Books LLC

Novels

Lucia St. Clair Robson by Books LLC

Published May 28th 2010
ISBN : 9781157118213
Paperback
28 pages
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 About the Book 

This is nonfiction commentary. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Shadow Patriots, Ride the Wind, Ghost Warrior, the Tokaido Road, LightMoreThis is nonfiction commentary. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Shadow Patriots, Ride the Wind, Ghost Warrior, the Tokaido Road, Light a Distant Fire, Fearless, a Novel of Sarah Bowman, Walk in My Soul, Marys Land. Source: Wikipedia. Free updates online. Not illustrated. Excerpt: Shadow Patriots is 2005 historical novel by Lucia St. Clair Robson. It tells of the Culper Ring, a group of George Washingtons spies operating out of New York City during the Revolution. The story includes familiar namesWashington, Alexander Hamilton, Benedict Arnold, Peggy Shippen -- and one unfamiliar number, the mysterious Spy 355. 355 was the Culpers code for lady, and after 225 years she remains a nameless heroine who, many historians believe, died for her country. The Culpers transported their intelligence from British-occupied Manhattan to Setauket, then across Long Island Sound to Washingtons troops in Connecticut. The book covers more than secret codes, invisible ink, double agents, and aliases. An estimated 11,500 American soldiers died in British custody here. The prison ship martyrs, as theyre called, are part of this story, as well as intrigue in Philadelphia, the battles of Brooklyn, Monmouth, and Stony Point, the betrayal of West Point, and the hardships of the winter encampments at Valley Forge and Morristown. There was nothing sweet about the Livingston Sugar House. The old refinery stood near the blackened ruins of Trinity Church, but it was as ungodly as it was bitter. The stone building rose five stories high. The heads of American prisoners of war jammed every small, barred window. They stood with the shortest in front and the tallest behind, each man trying to breathe fresh air. While they were about it they lowered baskets and shouted requests for food at passersby, but most people gave them a wide berth...More: http: //booksllc.net/?id=268595